Your immigration interview is one of the most important parts of the immigration process. We’ll help get you prepared for success before you go in.

Almost no immigration matter can be completed until a formal interview with the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) has been conducted. That being said, it is very important that interviewees are fully prepared for the procedure(s) facing them; failure to adequately complete the immigration interview process could dramatically jeopardize an individual’s ability to successfully secure citizenship or anything else.

Although every interview with the USCIS will differ slightly from the next, there are certain aspects of the process that can be prepared for, so as to avoid any unnecessary misinterpretations that could negatively affect the wellbeing of your case. To best prepare yourself for the immigration interview ahead of you, we encourage you to review the following do’s and don’ts, and to speak with a New York immigration lawyer from Pozo Goldstein, LLP before the process begins.

What to Do During Your Interview

It is the responsibility of the USCIS official who conducts your interview to determine if there is anything about your personal background and / or current circumstances that could present as disadvantageous to allowing you to proceed with your immigration request. While the decision that is ultimately made will primarily depend upon the nature of the circumstances that are specific to your case, there are steps that can be taken to ensure that you stand the best chance of obtaining the immigration status that you desire.

DO:

  • Arrive to the interview prepared, i.e. with copies in hand of all forms and original documents that pertain to the content of the interview. The more you are able to respond to questions pertaining to your documentation without the need to frequently reference these materials, the better.
  • Arrive to the interview on time, if not a little ahead of schedule. Not only does it make a good impression to arrive promptly, but the USCIS is also notoriously difficult when it comes to rescheduling. Generally, requesting a change to an interview time is will not be well-received by the USCIS.
  • Answer only the questions asked of you by the USCIS official who is interviewing you. You are not required to provide further information beyond the substance of the question that is asked.
  • Dress for the occasion. Although it’s not required to dress nicely, a person’s attire can make a good first impression.
  • Remain calm, even if you don’t fully understand the question being asked of you. It’s not uncommon to experience a misunderstanding or misinterpretation, and it’s perfectly acceptable to ask for the question to be rephrased.
  • Be prepared to answer questions that are personal if you are attending an immigration interview that pertains to your marriage to a U.S. citizen.
  • Hire an immigration attorney to accompany you. With a legal professional on your side, you can rest more easily knowing that you have someone advocating on your behalf in the event that a misunderstanding or misinterpretation should occur.
  • What Not to Do During Your Interview

    Just as there are certain behaviors that can enhance your immigration interview experience, so too are there behaviors that could hinder your ability to do well during this process. Accordingly, it would be wise to review the following list of “don’ts” to ensure that you are fully aware of what might not be well-received during your interview.

    DON’T:

  • Arrive late or fail to appear for your interview without first notifying the USCIS of your absence or tardy.
  • Argue with a spouse or family member during the interview. It can look unprofessional – and unconvincing – if you and a loved one do not display good relations in front of the USCIS official who is conducting your interview.
  • Question the USCIS officer in what could be interpreted as an offensive manner. For example, if the USCIS officer suggests that you failed to complete your application correctly, do not argue with him or her. Rather, inquire as to how the application is incorrect and try to support yourself with the documents that you have brought along with you to the interview.
  • Joke with the USICS officer who is conducting your interview. This is a serious time that should be handled as such. Jokes are not appropriate for the situation, and could be interpreted incorrectly, especially if they involve topics related to drugs, disease, or any other type of criminally offensive behavior.
  • Lie in response to any of the questions that are asked of you by the USCIS officer. If you have any reason to believe that one or more of the answers you give to an officer during the interview could hinder your success during the interview, then you should absolutely have an attorney by your side during the process.
  • Why You need Pozo Goldstein, LLP On Your Side

    Attending an immigration interview of any nature is not something to be taken lightly. A lot can be on the line at this time, and if it’s not handled appropriately, your case could be adversely affected. Therefore, it is highly encouraged that you seek the legal representation of an attorney at our firm before attending your immigration interview. When you’re instructed by a professional at our office, you can attend your interview feeling confident and fully prepared for the questions that will inevitably be asked of you.

    Together, the lawyers at our firm have spent the past half century representing individuals through all different types of immigration matters. We are prepared to do the same for you, especially if it concerns helping prep you for an upcoming immigration interview. Our legal services are offered in English, Spanish, French, Italian, and Portuguese, so don’t wait to contact a New York City immigration attorney at our office for the help that you both need and deserve at this time.